Page 6: Tabard

Since I was overwhelmed by the complications of this costume, I stopped working for several months. When I finally pulled it out of its chest, I wanted to start with something easy. Although doing the embroidery cannot be called easy, it consists of several hours of the same technique. You do not need to work through all the notes again to get an overview. Therefore, it seemed perfect as a starting point.

As I already mentioned when talking about the bodice, I used blue soutache. Half of the embroidery contains about 15 yards (!). I needed about 12 hours to do this part.

The black cotton is sewn to the thin silk, so that it gets a little bit stiffer. Due to the enorm size of the piece, I had to fold it.

All of the work has do be done by hand.

Fully embroidered it looks like this:

The endings were secured with heat.

To prevent visible topstitching on the right side of the fabric, I used another technique. First of all, I cut some strips of fabric and sewed them to the tabard. In the next step, they were folded around the edge. Afterwards, everything was folded to the inside, so that the strips could not be seen from the front. As a result, I was able to sew them to the lining of the tabard with tiny stitches. I know that the description sounds very complicated, but the process should be more clear on a photo.

Instead of being sewn to the skirt, the tabard was planned to be a separate piece. Therefore, it is closed with hooks and loop.


Back to the Senate Main Page

Back to Page 5

Further reading: Page 7

Merken